New Design Technologies Change Aircraft Maintenance Procedures

The aviation industry is changing. New design technologies have dramatically changed the way aircraft are built and maintained. It is the latter aspect though that requires more legwork and adjustment on the part of airline operators.

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Aircraft maintenance is a central concern of airlines. Typically, aircraft, especially commercial ones, are checked before and after each flight. Weather conditions and in-flight incidences potentially affect the machine. Crews ensure that flights are sound before taking off. Commercial airlines all value passenger safety as its number one priority.

Checking these planes takes hours. Maintenance crew are instructed to be unforgivingly diligent and thorough in checking each part of the aircraft before giving the green signal for take-off.

Technology, meanwhile, has simplified this process. New aircraft designs now include software that allow crews to perform diagnostics via the cockpit or even a mobile device. This means that troubleshooting can be done simultaneous with the flight.

This way, the pilot can be alerted immediately to any shift or change in the aircraft. Pilots are already trained to handle challenging situations; however, this new system of instant diagnostic software provides an additional safety net of knowledge.

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Additionally, the software cuts the time required for ground crew to perform their maintenance checks. Commercial lines can now, potentially, handle more flights because inspections are expedited. A full aircraft check, however, is still required under aviation guidelines, and airline companies should not neglect these.

North Star Aviation in Mankato, MN offers fixed-base operator (FBO) services for aircraft, including maintenance and repair. To learn more about the company, view this LinkedIn page.

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